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wineisabottledpoetry:

inspiration - inspiring picture on Favim.com on We Heart It. http://weheartit.com/entry/46835062

wineisabottledpoetry:

inspiration - inspiring picture on Favim.com on We Heart It. http://weheartit.com/entry/46835062

hugeinjapan:

Dinner Last Night: 

Atomic Buffalo Turds — Jalapenos stuffed with cream cheese, smoked paprika, cayenne, topped with pulled brisket, wrapped in bacon and smoked. 

Awful name. Great dish.

Cullen talked about them the other day, so I gave it a whirl for the first time in a while. There are a thousand ways to do them. Here, I beat burnt ends into the cream cheese with the spices, stuffed the peppers, topped with the brisket, wrapped with bacon an smoked them for an hour. The cream cheese and the chutney cut the heat a bit.

A nice little bite. 

What are the health words of the year?

What are the health words of the year?

How much salt is in your diet?

How much salt is in your diet?

How to find out preeclampsia

Preeclampsia is a syndrome characterized by single or in combination of symptoms such as edema, proteinuria or hypertension in a pregnant woman. The initials of the words of these three symptoms (edema, proteinuria, Hypertension) was coined the acronym EPH, with which indicated the concomitant presence of this symptom triad (gestosis trisintomatica). Read the article.

Global Health News 
Under Creative Commons License: Attribution Non-Commercial

doctorswithoutborders:

Photo: A health worker administers preventive malaria treatment to a child in Koutiala. Mali 2012 © Estrella Lasry

Novel Program Shows Strong Promise in Malaria Prevention

A large-scale malaria prevention program, consisting of intermittent distributions of anti-malaria medicines, appears to be drastically reducing the number of new cases of the disease among young children during peak transmission season, according to preliminary results from our projects in Chad and Mali.

doctorswithoutborders:

Photo: A health worker administers preventive malaria treatment to a child in Koutiala. Mali 2012 © Estrella Lasry

Novel Program Shows Strong Promise in Malaria Prevention

A large-scale malaria prevention program, consisting of intermittent distributions of anti-malaria medicines, appears to be drastically reducing the number of new cases of the disease among young children during peak transmission season, according to preliminary results from our projects in Chad and Mali.

jayparkinsonmd:

Every year, an estimated 4,000 cases of “retained surgical items,” as they are known in the medical world, are reported in the United States. These are items left in the patient’s body after surgery, and the vast majority are gauzelike sponges used to soak up blood. During a long operation, doctors may stuff dozens of them inside a patient to control bleeding.
Though no two cases are the same, the core of the problem, experts say, is that surgical teams rely on an old-fashioned method to avoid leaving sponges in patients. In most operating rooms, a nurse keeps a manual count of the sponges a surgeon uses in a procedure. But in that busy and sometimes chaotic environment, miscounts occur, and every so often a sponge ends up on the wrong side of the stitches.

jayparkinsonmd:

Every year, an estimated 4,000 cases of “retained surgical items,” as they are known in the medical world, are reported in the United States. These are items left in the patient’s body after surgery, and the vast majority are gauzelike sponges used to soak up blood. During a long operation, doctors may stuff dozens of them inside a patient to control bleeding.

Though no two cases are the same, the core of the problem, experts say, is that surgical teams rely on an old-fashioned method to avoid leaving sponges in patients. In most operating rooms, a nurse keeps a manual count of the sponges a surgeon uses in a procedure. But in that busy and sometimes chaotic environment, miscounts occur, and every so often a sponge ends up on the wrong side of the stitches.

ucsdhealthsciences:

Empty cages
This week, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) announced the looming retirement of 110 chimpanzees from biomedical research, the latest move in a broader effort to ultimately ban all medical research involving chimpanzees in this country.
The scientific need for chimps – with whom humans share about 96 percent of the same genetic code – has been declining for decades, in part through the advocacy of groups like In Defense of Animals and advocates like chimpanzee researcher Jane Goodall, but also because researchers have found or developed other, more acceptable animal models and computer simulations. Last year, the Institute of Medicine that concluded there was almost no scientific need for doing biomedical research on chimps.
There are, according to the IOM, about 1,000 chimps available for research in the United States, about half owned by the government. Of the newly retired 110 chimps, all currently residing at the New Iberia Research Center in Louisiana, 10 will be moved to Chimp Haven, a federally supported but almost full sanctuary. The remaining chimps will go to the Texas Biomedical Research Institute, which has the facilities to care for them but will conduct no research involving them.
“This is a significant step in winding down NIH’s investment in chimpanzee research based on the way science has evolved and our great sensitivity to the special nature of these remarkable animals, our closest relatives,” NIH Director Francis Collins told The Washington Post.
The history of chimpanzee research is long and varied, fraught with tales of triumph and sorrow. Chimpanzees have been used to test pharmaceuticals, surgical procedures, disease transmission, behavior, cognition and the effects of trauma, both physical and mental. Most chimps have served science anonymously. A few have become famous, such as Washoe, a female chimp who learned American Sign Language and even taught her son, Louis, bits of it, and Ham (pictured above) who became the first chimp to venture into outer space in 1961.
Washoe lived most of her life on the campus of Central Washington University and died in 2007 at the age of 42. Ham, after his 16-minute tour 157 miles above the Earth, spent the rest of his life living in zoos, receiving fan mail and occasionally appearing on TV. He died in 1983 at the age of 26.
Even after death, chimpanzees continue to inform the human condition. A collection of chimpanzee skeletons, collected over 30 years by a now-defunct Arizona sanctuary, are being digitized by the Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny at UC San Diego for future study.
The skeletons, CARTA co-director Ajit Varki told The San Diego Union-Tribune in 2009, could hold important clues to human origins.

ucsdhealthsciences:

Empty cages

This week, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) announced the looming retirement of 110 chimpanzees from biomedical research, the latest move in a broader effort to ultimately ban all medical research involving chimpanzees in this country.

The scientific need for chimps – with whom humans share about 96 percent of the same genetic code – has been declining for decades, in part through the advocacy of groups like In Defense of Animals and advocates like chimpanzee researcher Jane Goodall, but also because researchers have found or developed other, more acceptable animal models and computer simulations. Last year, the Institute of Medicine that concluded there was almost no scientific need for doing biomedical research on chimps.

There are, according to the IOM, about 1,000 chimps available for research in the United States, about half owned by the government. Of the newly retired 110 chimps, all currently residing at the New Iberia Research Center in Louisiana, 10 will be moved to Chimp Haven, a federally supported but almost full sanctuary. The remaining chimps will go to the Texas Biomedical Research Institute, which has the facilities to care for them but will conduct no research involving them.

“This is a significant step in winding down NIH’s investment in chimpanzee research based on the way science has evolved and our great sensitivity to the special nature of these remarkable animals, our closest relatives,” NIH Director Francis Collins told The Washington Post.

The history of chimpanzee research is long and varied, fraught with tales of triumph and sorrow. Chimpanzees have been used to test pharmaceuticals, surgical procedures, disease transmission, behavior, cognition and the effects of trauma, both physical and mental. Most chimps have served science anonymously. A few have become famous, such as Washoe, a female chimp who learned American Sign Language and even taught her son, Louis, bits of it, and Ham (pictured above) who became the first chimp to venture into outer space in 1961.

Washoe lived most of her life on the campus of Central Washington University and died in 2007 at the age of 42. Ham, after his 16-minute tour 157 miles above the Earth, spent the rest of his life living in zoos, receiving fan mail and occasionally appearing on TV. He died in 1983 at the age of 26.

Even after death, chimpanzees continue to inform the human condition. A collection of chimpanzee skeletons, collected over 30 years by a now-defunct Arizona sanctuary, are being digitized by the Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny at UC San Diego for future study.

The skeletons, CARTA co-director Ajit Varki told The San Diego Union-Tribune in 2009, could hold important clues to human origins.

No smoke
Uno studio tedesco da poco pubblicato sulla rivista Addiction Biology rivelerebbe che chi fuma non solo riposa meno, ma anche peggio rispetto ai non fumatori.  Che la sigaretta nuoce gramente al ritmo del sonno è cosa ormai nota, infatti sono anni che gli studiosi invitano a non fumare prima di andare a dormire.Salute Notizie http://www.salutenotizie.com/i-fumatori-soffrono-di-disturbi-al-sonno-195.html

No smoke

Uno studio tedesco da poco pubblicato sulla rivista Addiction Biology rivelerebbe che chi fuma non solo riposa meno, ma anche peggio rispetto ai non fumatori.  Che la sigaretta nuoce gramente al ritmo del sonno è cosa ormai nota, infatti sono anni che gli studiosi invitano a non fumare prima di andare a dormire.

Salute Notizie http://www.salutenotizie.com/i-fumatori-soffrono-di-disturbi-al-sonno-195.html